Henry Chesbrough

A Profile of Open Innovation Managers in Multinational Companies

Open innovation is widely used in large companies and we know increasingly more about how to manage this process. In contrast, we know virtually nothing about the managers and practitioners who are driving open innovation in large companies. Who are the managers operating in open innovation teams or units? What is their profile? How long do they stay in an open innovation job, and what is their tenure in the company? This report tries to answer these questions based on an investigation of open innovation managers on LinkedIn.

The Four Essential Steps Towards Open Innovation Success

Although ‘open innovation’ is the talk of the town in R&D circles, leveraging external sources of innovation remains challenging for most companies. In 2013, researchers Dr. Joel West (Keck Graduate, Institute of Applied Life Sciences) and Dr. Marcel Bogers (University of Southern Denmark) suggested a four-phase model for inbound innovation projects. They emphasized that open innovation needs to go further than just obtaining external ideas. Integration, commercialization and the interaction between the firm and its collaborators are just as important. This post explores the four essential steps towards open innovation success.

Is Open Government the Same as Open Innovation?

For many years, companies were convinced of the competitive advantage of closed research and development. They jealously protected their intellectual property behind closed doors and dramatically revealed it to the public after years of development. This old model has since been replaced by open innovation.

Overcoming the Challenges to Successful Open Innovation

Before any organization can reap the economic benefits of open innovation, it must overcome a number of legal, operational and cultural challenges. In this article Peter von Dyck addresses the top three obstacles to open innovation: managing intellectual property issues and other legal risks, processing ideas quickly and establishing an efficient internal structure.

Open Innovation: Lego and Bagels

Arguably, the principle of Open Innovation was utilised for the first time by Professor James Murray in 19th Century Oxford, England. In the time that has passed since then, this concept has become infinitely easier to implement thanks to the development of Innovation Management technology, however some companies are yet to wake up to its potential.

Open Innovation Intermediaries: Are they valuable?

The success of Open Innovation hinges on many organizational aspects as we have discussed extensively on the MOOI forum in the past months and will continue to do so until the end of this year. From the beginning of next year, we will start co-creating our e-book on the Management and Organization of Open Innovation in a joint effort with the MOOI forum members.

Pushing the boundaries – part 3: Making open innovation relevant to more economic players

This is the last article in a series of three, illustrating how we can push the boundaries within open innovation research. After reading a recently published strategy book by Rita McGrath, “The end of competitive advantage”, the writer is convinced that it offers several handles to understand open innovation in a broader, strategic context.

The R&D department: From Innovation Engine to Part of the OI Machine?

The success of Open Innovation hinges on many organizational aspects as we have discussed extensively on the MOOI forum in the past months and will continue to do so as of September 2014 onwards. To summarize, we have discussed corporate strategy, top management, organizational structures, HR, culture, and IP in light of Open Innovation.

Pushing the Boundaries – Part 2: Making Open Innovation Relevant to More Economic Players

The MOOI-forum is in its 5th month now, focusing on Open Innovation and corporate culture as theme. Every month, great discussions emerge on the forum. This article takes a look at how open innovation can be applied in many different strategic settings compared to the showcases described in different publications during the last decade.

Soft is Hard to Change: The Challenge of aligning HR with Open Innovation

The fourth theme addressed by MOOI is the relation between Open Innovation and Human Resource Management. This article delves deeper into the few articles that have arisen on HR and OI in the academic and professional literatures and the lessons that can be drawn from these existing sources. It also shares some of the take aways from the MOOI-forum discussions on this particular topic focus.

Organizational Processes and Structures Supporting Open Innovation

Open innovation cannot be implemented in companies without the right organizational structure and processes supporting it. What are these organizational structures and processes that facilitate open innovation in companies? They determine the success of open innovation practices and, therefore, this theme clearly deserves more attention from managers. It is surprising that very few academic and professional articles have been written about this topic.

Pushing the Boundaries – Part 1: Understanding the Different “Faces” of Open Innovation

The MOOI-forum is in its 4th month now, focusing on Human Resources Management and Open Innovation as monthly theme. Every month, great discussions emerge on the forum. One topic that came back each month but remained somewhat in the background is what we could label “the different faces of open innovation”.

The Role of Top Management in Open Innovation

Implementing open innovation requires a shift in mindset and a change in culture. It requires individuals to be open for external ideas and to share knowledge. This is not the way innovation is managed traditionally. For individuals to behave in a way that fosters open innovation, support from the top management seems to be crucial. Is this really the case? Or are top executives too far away from the action when it comes to innovation and open innovation?

Open Innovation Past and Present: an Exclusive Interview with Henry Chesbrough

Though intensely talked about, open innovation remains a subject matter that both fascinates and creates apprehension among business professionals. In the following interview, Henry Chesbrough, the father of open innovation according to Wikipedia, has sat down with IM.se to discuss a few key aspects of this largely new and challenging innovation model: its evolution, its applicability and most importantly, its essential role in facilitating knowledge creation for the future. He teaches at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, and Esade Business School in Barcelona.

Chesbrough on Service Innovation

Henry Chesbrough has earned a worldwide reputation for his pioneering work on open innovation, influencing a generation of executives by identifying and describing the practice of innovating in collaborative groups outside the enterprise. We caught up with Henry to talk about his upcoming appearance at the European Innovation Conference and his new book.