What Can We Learn from NASA About Crowdsourcing in a Pandemic?

When COVID-19 shut down the United States in 2020, everyone wanted to be a part of the solution. At NASA, the entire NASA workforce expressed their desire to help the nation combat the virus – even though most of their employees were asked to work from home.

Recession, Innovation and Survival – A Lesson from Kellogg’s

In times of severe recession should you cut costs and focus on survival or take the opportunity to invest in innovation so that you can benefit from the eventual recovery? Let's have a look at a case study of Kellogg's, which took a leap to invest in a new type of cereal - and that paid off even in the face of extreme adversity.

2020-04-02T13:06:25-07:00March 31st, 2020|Categories: Strategies|Tags: , , , |

Digital Transformation and Its Impact on New-Product Management for Manufacturers

For the manufacturer undertaking new-product development, Digital Transformation means smart new products with embedded software. Digital products in turn require software and hardware development teams to work together – a hybrid project – which ultimately leads to combining software development methods with the more traditional gating process that manufacturers use.

How NASA Leads Intrapreneurial Innovation

Not everyone knows that NASA has embedded crowdsourcing into their strategy and capabilities. But in fact, back in 2011 (after they ran a highly successful crowdsourcing pilot) NASA established the Center of Excellence for Collaborative Innovation (CoECI).

Spotless: An Innovation Roadmap

Bridie Scott is an Innovation Manager at Spotless and she’s taken the business on a journey from a large-scale company with big goals to a company that is listening to and empowering all of their frontline employees in the innovation process.

How Technology Can Augment Human Collaboration

Innovation requires collaboration, but collaboration is stuck in a rut. Data science can help us climb out. It can increase the scale, the intentionality, and the nuance of how we collaborate. With the right data and algorithms, we can set our teams up to do something innovative.

5 Things Innovative Companies Can Learn From Amazon

It is no secret that Amazon is a titan of industry. Given their tremendous success, they are quite obviously doing more than a few things right. While there are undoubtedly a myriad of different reasons that this company has become the giant that it now is, today we will be taking a look at five of the lessons that other companies can learn from Amazon.

Innovative Ideas for Combining Traditional and Digital Marketing

In 2010, Pepsi invested millions of dollars in the “Pepsi Refresh Project,” moving their entire marketing strategy to social media. The campaign was, of course, widely promoted via online networking channels and, in the beginning, it seemed like a huge success.

Lessons from Apple on Why Aesthetic Innovation is Important

It’s pretty much impossible to argue with Apple’s success. It’s one of the most valuable companies in the world, and has maintained dominance for its reputation as an innovative company that produces top-of-the-line hardware. Because of its products and brand reputation, Apple has gained a cult following that will buy nearly every new product that emerges, year after year. So why, even with the high price tag, are so many consumers willing to shell out for every new gadget that comes along?

How the Innovation Principle Supplements and Balances the Precautionary Principle

The aim of the precautionary principle seems laudable: lacking scientific consensus, the burden of proof for an action or policy not being harmful to the public or to the environment lies on those taking that action. In practice, however, this principle has proven a deterrent for innovation - particularly within the EU. How can the innovation principle - that is, examining new policies or plans for a negative impact they have on innovation - help to supplement and balance out the precautionary principle?

The Innovator’s Dilemma: Lessons from Kodak

I guess everyone knows the tragic story of the EastmanKodak Company: founded in the 19th century, dominating the photographic film market during most of the 20th century and finally collapsing into bankruptcy in the early 21st century, shaken by a new technology they had once decisively initiated.