Balancing Innovation Via Organizational Ambidexterity – Part 1

Organizational ambidexterity is becoming a Key Factor for Success in many industries. With a proper ambidextrous set-up, firms can optimally balance radical and incremental innovation.This is part 1 of a 3-part article co-written by innovation-3’s Frank Mattes and Ralph-Christian Ohr from Integrative Innovation. In this article we are showing the need for organizational ambidexterity, introduce the concept, show how it can be implemented and provide two case studies from leading German firms

How Status Quo Bias Can Kill Innovation

Status quo bias is a proven cognitive bias that exists in all normal people. Innovation, especially breakthrough innovation, requires veering from the status quo. As a result, the average managers is all too likely not to approve a highly innovative idea, not because of any intrinsic flaw in the idea, but because the idea would require change. You need to work around this bias if you truly want your company to innovate.

The ‘Best’ Ideas are Rarely the Most Creative

Frequently, brainstorms, idea campaigns and similar idea extravaganzas end with a vague notion of choosing the best idea. The problem here is that a truly creative idea, the kind of idea that has the potential to become a breakthrough innovation is seldom the best solution to the problem or the best path to achieving a goal - for the very simple reason that highly creative ideas are original. They cannot directly be compared to existing notions, warns Jeffrey Baumgartner.

The Eternal Battle Between Important & Urgent – Can be Solved

Do you often find yourself procrastinating on important, yet non-urgent matters in order to take care of the stuff that needs immediate attention? This all-too-common circumstance also takes place on a larger scale. Bengt Järrehult walks us though how to deal with the incremental and breakthrough projects at the same time

Jugaad: Lessons in Frugal Innovation

Resourcefulness amid serious constraints is known in India as ‘Jugaad.’ In this article, Accenture’s Mitali Sharma suggests this simple concept — which gave birth to a $2,500 car, a $12 solar lamp, and a life-saving incubator made from car parts — might be the antidote to the complexity plaguing your innovation process.

Innovation’s Silent Killer

If they want to compete successfully in the future, companies should hold off on rapid ideation and faster commercialization until they take an unflinching look at what is truly stifling breakthrough innovation. In this article, Soren Kristensen provides insight on how honest self-reflection can free you from your biggest impediment to growth.

How to Avoid the Innovation Death Spiral

Consider this all too familiar scenario: Company X’s new products developed and launched with great expectations, yield disappointing results. Yet, these products continue to languish in the market, draining management attention, advertising budgets, manufacturing capacity, warehouse space and back office systems. Wouter Koetzier explores how to avoid the innovation death spiral.

When you Need Breakthrough Ideas, Consider Anti-conventional Thinking

When you need to develop ideas, don't just focus on generating a large quantity of them. The originality of them is even more important. That's when you should consider Jeffrey Baumgartner's anti-conventional thinking technique.

Want Breakthrough Innovation? Then Don’t Listen to your Customers

Crowdsourcing and customer-focused innovation are very popular today. But by themselves, they're not a very good way to achieve breakthrough innovation, warns Jeffrey Baumgartner.

Bad attitudes can lead to good innovation – so hire some rebels

How can you build a team that is innovative, dynamic and capable of finding breakthroughs for tough problems? How can you avoid repeating dreary routines and find sparkling new ideas instead? What can you do to turn a division 2 team into Premiership winners? One way is to make sure that among your solid citizens you have a good sprinkling of rebels, according to Paul Sloane.

The middle ground of innovation

When companies start up a new venture to explore a breakthrough innovation, there are many challenges. Some are operational, but others are caused by the ways in which leaders and managers typically think about their work. Vijay Govindarajan and Chris Trimble, in their new book, 10 Rules for Strategic Innovators, describe how companies often get lost in the gap between the beginning of the innovation process, were creativity is needed, and the end of the innovation process, were efficiency is needed.

2020-09-08T16:00:07-07:00June 2nd, 2006|Categories: Book Review|Tags: |

Need breakthrough innovation? Resist the temptation to ‘build a better mousetrap’

product development in many industries. Moreover, the percentage of ideas that make it from lab to consumer is low. One factor that affects the probability of success is how innovators look at a given development challenge or problem.