The Six Pillars of Innovation Culture

Every year, IdeaScale asks our customers what their main priorities are for the coming year, and without fail one of the top two priorities is to create a culture of innovation. Every innovation thought leader, every organizational engagement specialist, every pundit or leader in transformation says that this is the secret to avoiding disruption.

Whitepaper: Stimulating and Measuring Open and Cross Innovation 

As two intermediaries from Hamburg that foster open and cross innovation processes, Science Scout (an initiative of Hamburg Innovation) and Cross Innovation Hub (Hamburg Kreativ Gesellschaft) joined forces to start a discussion around the stimulation and measurement of open and cross innovation processes.

In Search of the Perfect Brainstorm: An Update of Collaborative Ideation

Imaginary scenario: you have been invited to a meeting to [...]

Is South Africa the Next Silicon Valley?

When you think of the most innovative places in the world, what do you picture? Silicon Valley and its array of tech startups? Tokyo, because it has the highest number of patents filed worldwide? London, where over 15% of the workforce is employed in the tech sector? Or are you imagining somewhere else?

The Key to Success In 2021: Building a Creative and Innovative Culture

In this article by Jeff DeGraff, he presents the four types of innovative cultures and four best practices for building a culture of innovation.

Strategies that Promote Workplace Diversity and Make Your Business More Innovative

At IdeaScale, we’ve learned that diversity combined with equity and inclusion leads to more innovative thinking: businesses that are run by culturally diverse teams are more likely to develop new products, 45% more likely to grow market share, and more likely to have a 2X innovation revenue.

2021-03-24T19:36:59-07:00February 9th, 2021|Categories: Organization & Culture|Tags: , |

How Does Diversity and Inclusion Impact Innovation?

Nearly all executives believe the long-term success of their business depends on the flow, testing, and development of new ideas. One of the problems is the old belief in the “creative genius” – that creativity and innovation belongs to a talented few and not to everyone.

2021-03-24T19:37:14-07:00October 19th, 2020|Categories: Collaborative Innovation, Organization & Culture|Tags: , , , |

Using Innovation to Improve Your McKinsey Organizational Health Index Score

2020 proved just how important our relationships to banks and credit unions are as they worked to rapidly respond to the changing financial needs of their customers.

Why Let Others Disrupt You? Take the Smart Self-Disruption Journey!

In a time when uncertainty reigns, the fear of being disrupted can brutally hurt any business. Responsible leaders who dare to anticipate disruption and take steps to self-inflict it to their organization in a smart and controlled way are best positioned for the future.

Let Culture Drive Online Innovation Teams

Online innovation teams need to be especially mindful of cultural sensitivities among members and adapt accordingly. Evidence suggests that cultural diversity is a major asset for innovation teams. Under remote operating environments, cultural awareness and sensitivity is of heightened significance, and appropriate practices need to be deployed.

Five Perspectives of Innovation Management Maturity

The success of innovation management is never an accident; it’s a holistic management process with an iterative thought-out planning and execution continuum.

How Idea Management can Help Advance Workplace Neurodiversity

Awareness of neurodiversity has certainly increased over the past few years and workplaces are gradually becoming more accommodating and accepting of neurodiverse employees. But after years of neglect and of neurodiverse candidates being overlooked for roles for which they are inherently suited, there is still a lot of progress that needs to be made.

7 Modern Trends That Are Innovating Traditional Workplaces

The workplace of today little resembles the cubicles of yesteryear. More people telecommute and enjoy flextime options. Rather than a traditional top-down structure, many companies embrace a more democratic arrangement.