Quantum Computing, Zen Philosophy and Space-Time

The up-and-coming field of quantum computing, currently in a prototype phase, will probably be an innovation with exponential and wide-ranging impacts in the power and speed of information technology. There are some interesting parallels between the behavior of quantum computing particles, or qubits, and basic principles of Zen Buddhist philosophy. Like modern physics, this article employs a “space-time” concept of innovation, with implications for the process and intensity of new idea development within organizations.

Five Takeaways from Our Innovation Conversation with Clorox

IdeaScale hosts a monthly podcast with innovation leaders, intrapreneurs, and other game changers out there. This past month our interviewee was Dr. Navin Kunde who currently leads the Open Innovation group at The Clorox Company, a US-based consumer goods company in the Fortune 500.

Zen Philosophy for Stretching Innovation Space-Time

The non-duality principle of Zen philosophy suggests a more intensive approach to the dimensions of innovation “space-time.” Business teams should stop following a simple sequential procedure in which new ideas are accepted or rejected almost as soon as they arise. Instead, they should take extra time and create a “learning space” or study environment for all of the new ideas in place of the typical reactive, judgmental, for-or-against decision-making process. Connections between these ideas may lead to further innovation opportunities.

The Importance of Senior Management Involvement for Innovation

Senior management is without a doubt a tough job. If you’re one of the few executives at the top of a large organization, there are likely hundreds of people; customers, employees, partners, and the list goes on; who are all looking for your attention regarding an endless sea of different topics and initiatives.

Innovation Insights from the Founder of Sony

Akio Morita was born in Nagoya, Japan in 1921. His father owned a business brewing sake. It had been in the family for 14 generations and it was expected that Akio, the oldest son, would step into the business but the boy was more interested in electronics than in brewing.

2019-10-15T15:28:24-07:00November 21st, 2018|Categories: Organization & Culture|Tags: , , , , , |

What’s the Difference Between Innovation and Knowledge Transfer

The internet was revolutionary in that it democratized the spread of information and ideas at a much faster rate than any other channel in. With the increased adoption of computing, we’ve also tracked the rise of “distributed knowledge” databases like Quora or Wikipedia. What is interesting is how powerful these specialized knowledge bases can prove to be in the context of innovation.

What the Ideation Platform Marketplace is Getting Wrong – the 7-Year Itch?

The ideation platform marketplace hasn’t really changed that much in the past 7 years or so. There was an early burst of innovative design and alignment with user needs, but at this point the sector seems to have stagnated in terms of how they add value. Call it reaching middle age, or perhaps they are having a 7-year itch?

Small Businesses can Overcome Financial Woes Through Innovation

Starting up a small business can be rough. Even if you possess near-infinite entrepreneurial spirit, chances are that you’ll run into some roadblocks along the way. Whether these obstacles are based in logistics of strategy and implementation of your business model, or even issues with the very products and services you offer, most of these problems can be solved with financial influx.

How New Technologies Are Innovating the Legal Industry

Don't expect practice of the law to be exempt from any of the ongoing digital transformations. There's actually an abundance of new technology that stands a good chance at revolutionizing how we study, practice and interpret the law — in the U.S. and beyond. Here's a look at some of the frontrunners.

What Contributes to Nonprofit Innovation

In an article by the Stanford Social Innovation Review, the authors addressed a recent study from the Bridgespan Group that identified an innovation in the nonprofit sector. Although 80% of nonprofit leaders consider innovation an imperative, only 40% of those leaders consider their organization ready for innovation. SSIR went on to discuss the six characteristics that empower nonprofit innovation.

Learn to Lead Effectively and Innovate Your Business

Businesses must adapt and innovate to succeed in today's marketplace. However, innovation is not a part-time undertaking. It’s the foundation for effective organizational management and taps into the creative power of staff members.

Five Digital Profiles of Innovators

Organizations need to invest in the cultivation of capacity for innovation and recognize innovators with varying talent and strengths.